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PILATES EXERCISES FOR TIGHT HAMSTRINGS

July 2, 2019

 

 

This is Joseph Pilates going through some of his exercises and there is a lot of work using the legs and the hamstrings - the large group of muscles at the back of the thighs. Pilates invented his exercises from his knowledge of anatomy, how animals moved in the wild and from his fitness background.  

 

 

 

 

WHAT ARE THE HAMSTRINGS?

 

 

 

These are a large group of  muscles at the rear of the upper leg:

 

 

 

Semimembranosus

 

Biceps Femoris

 

Gluteus Maximus

 

Gracilis

 

Semitendinosus

 

Adductor Magnus

 

 

 

 

 

The Hamstrings originate from the hip or 'sitting bones' and end behind the knee where the main muscles join.

 

 

WHAT DO THE HAMSTRINGS DO?

 

They help the pelvis to rotate, 

 

They are used for walking, running and jumping,

 

They flex the knee,

 

Extend the hip when starting to walk,

 

They are the drivers of the Quadricep muscles at the front of the thigh

 

Control knee extension,

 

extend in the sitting position due to their origins in the hip.

 

Assist in the working of the gluteal muscles to extend the hip

 

 

 

WHAT CAUSES TIGHT HAMSTRINGS?

 

 

Genetics

 

Sports

 

Sitting for long periods

 

Injuries

 

No warm up or cool down

 

 

 

 

GENETICS

 

 

Some people are naturally predisposed to short hamstrings and have to work hard to keep their hamstrings strong and flexible.

 

 

SPORTS

 

 

Sprinting, football, tennis, dancing and running are the main sports that require explosive bursts of movement through the propulsion of the Quadriceps. The hamstrings are the drivers of the Quads and have to do a lot of work to get them going and need support from the surrounding muscles - the gluteals - in particular. If these muscles become underdeveloped or stop working,  the hamstrings takes over and get bigger and tighter.

 

 

SITTING FOR LONG PERIODS

 

 

The hamstrings have to extend for the sitting position and if this happens for long periods then the hamstrings have to work harder to support the pelvis, back and knees. Eventually, the hamstrings get short and tight because the Gluteals are inhibited due to lack of use.

 

 

INJURIES

 

 

Any injury to the lower spine, hip or knee can cause an instability throughout the lower body, aggravate the sciatic nerve, affect the mobility of the hip joint or cause instability to the lower back. In order to compensate the hamstrings  - due their connection to the hip and the knee - became the main stabilisers as well as mobilisers (their main job) and get bigger and tighter.  Eventually, the hamstrings get too big and cause the pelvis to rotate backwards, flattening the lower back leading to further back problems.

 

The brain recognises that there is an injury or threat to the body and will force a 'tightness' to protect a damaged disc in the back for example.

 

 

 

NO WARM UP OR COOL DOWN AFTER EXERCISE

 

 

A warm up before any exercise is important so that the muscles receive the right amount of glucose (energy) for sustained movement. If there is no warm up the brain releases hormones to utilise emergency glucose ('fight or flight') which can cause stress and damage to muscle fibres.  The brain then recognises that there has been some stress to hamstrings and will inhibit any further movement until the injuries have healed.  This cycle will continue if the muscles are in continual use until the brain accepts defeat, the hamstrings take over the job of the surrounding stabiliser muscles and over develop.

 

 

Cool down is very important using stretching to release carbon dioxide build up, improve flexibility and overall muscle strength.

 

 

 

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN HAMSTRINGS GET TOO TIGHT?

 

 

Range of motion in the pelvis is limited and alignment is affected.

 

Stress occurs across the lower back causing lower back problems

 

Posture is affected

 

Prone to injuries - torn hamstrings

 

 

 

TESTS FOR TIGHT HAMSTRINGS:

 

 

CAN YOU TOUCH YOUR TOES?

 

 RAISE YOUR LEG TO 80 DEGREE ANGLE ON YOUR BACK?

 

If you can do either of these then your hamstrings are not tight and there is could be another issue.

 

 

 

STRETCHING THE HAMSTRINGS

 

 

There are many stretches for hamstrings that provide temporary relief from tightness but they don't do much to create lasting changes in flexibility.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUGGESTED PILATES EXERCISES TO TRY:

 

 

SPINE STRETCH

 

Start in a sitting position with your legs as flat as p